nap_copyright2007.jpg
 Neal Prince Trust
being the Grantor to the
Neal A. Prince and Herbert W. Hemphill, Jr. Estate Holding Trust 05/08/2000,
which is the legal owner of this item below:


LOBEL, Paul (1899-1983), American
Bronze Sculpture
"The Ram"
(12" x 30"), Center Theatre, Rockefeller Center ca.1931
 

Neal Prince:

Artist A - G

Artist H - P

Artist Q - T

Artist U - Z

Source
Holdings:
NAPT1921.01
to
NAPT.1949.99
Source
Holdings:
NAPT1950.01
to
NAPT.1959.99
Source
Holdings:
NAPT1960.01
to
NAPT.1969.99
Source
Holdings:
NAPT1970.01
to
NAPT.1989.99
Source
Holdings:
NAPT1990.01
to
NAPT.2013.01

Costume Design Collection

Neal Prince & Herbert W. Hemphill, Jr. Collections 1950-1967

Fine Arts Appraisal for Herbert W. Hemphill, Jr., 1964

Fine Arts Appraisal for Neal Prince, 1969

 

CONTACT US

Inventory No: NAPT.1999.000014
 
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LOBEL, Paul (1899-1983) American, Sculpture (12"x30") c.1900

Inventory No: NAPT.1999.000014
 
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LOBEL, Paul (1899-1983) American, Sculpture (12"x30") c.1900

Inventory No: NAPT.1999.000014
 
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LOBEL, Paul (1899-1983) American, Sculpture (12"x30") c.1900


Inventory No: NAPT.1999.000014
 
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LOBEL, Paul (1899-1983) American, Sculpture (12"x30") c.1900

This item was deaccession This item was deaccession on November 1, 2016, which it was Auctioned off at Heritage Auctions on May 25th, being that certain 20th Century Design Auction Sale.

 

 

Artist:        Paul Lobel (1899-1983), American, Silversmith and Metalwork's

Title:            "The Ram"

Date:            ca. 1931 (Gifted to Mr. Prince, 1953)

Medium:      Decorative Bronze Sculpture (Wall Plaque)

Materials:     Bronze (Wall Plaque)

Markings:     Signed, by the artist on the lower left corner.

Dimensions: 14-1/4" x 49-1/2

Framed:        No

Inventory No.:

                     NAPT.1999.000014

Provenance:  Neal Prince Trust u/a/d 10.18.1999

                     Mr. Neal Prince

                     Mr. Neal Prince & Mr. Herbert Waide Hemphill, Jr.

                   Mr. Eurgene Lee Schoen, Original Interior Designer (1880-1957)

                     RKO, Roxy Center Theatre, Rockefeller Center, New York (demolished in 1954)

 

 


LOBEL, Paul (1899-1983), American, Silversmith and Metalwork

Paul Lobel was born in Rumanian, but raised in the United States. Though he is well known as a modernist studio jeweler Paul Lobel was also a painter, sculptor and designer of glass, furniture and silver hollowware. He studied commercial art at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn in the 1920s. He became a cartoonist and sold drawings to several national magazines and the New York Times newspaper. He attended the famous Exposition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris in 1925 and in 1926 exhibited thirty-five of his own works in a solo exhibition at the Grande Librarie Universelle de Paris. During the years 1928-1934, Lobel worked with Leo J. Uris to produce decorative sculpture and accessories and also created modernist hollowware of chrome influenced by the work of Jean Puiforcat. He participated in the exhibition, Contemporary American Industrial Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in 1934.





Eugene Schoen (1880-1957), Designer

A native New Yorker, Eugene Schoen (1880–1957) received a degree in architecture from Columbia University in 1901, and upon graduation won a scholarship to travel in Europe where he met Otto Wagner and Josef Hoffmann. Schoen established an architectural practice in New York City in 1905, and after seeing the 1925 Paris Exposition he was inspired to set up an interior decorating business at 115 E 60th Street, New York, where he remained until the reversals of the Depression forced a move to 43 West 39th Street. His timing was fortunate: by the late 1920’s when modernism made its initial forays into the American home, Schoen was perfectly placed to capitalize on its advances. He was even able to display complete room settings in his gallery in 1928, when most of his colleagues were competing for space in department store exhibitions. Furniture, textiles and rugs designed by Eugene Schoen were exhibited in several contemporary design exhibits. He participated in the two exhibits of industrial design held at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and exhibited furniture at the Pennsylvania Museum of Fine arts. Such example of this movement would have been illustrated within one of his commissions that he accepted to Interiors of the RKO Roxy Center Theatre in Rockefeller Center. Which the above item was extracted from and gifted to Mr. Prince, by Mr. Eugene Lee Schoen in 1953. At the time, Mr. Prince was the Chief Designer at the firm of Schoen & Hennessy. Though Mr. Eugene Schoen had retired from the day to day operations, he took a strong liking to Mr. Prince and developed Mr. Prince's areas of disciplines in the same manner as he had fifty years earlier. Mr. Eugene Schoen was one of the most important figures in development, shaping, and legitimizing of modern interior and furniture design in the United States from the 1920's to the early 1940's. He eventually turned to interiors and furniture design as forms of artistry compared to his architectural field. With the great influence from the 1925 International Exposition of Decorative Arts in Paris, which allowed Mr. Schoen to refocus his career from a large firm to a smaller firm in order to take on more high profile commissions? Such commissions were period rooms for several of the museum exhibitions, becoming better known for his design work and superior craftsmanship. His was commission to decorate the first fully functioning nightclub for the luxury liner, the S.S. Leviathan. This commission received much notoriety and set a new standard for all ocean-going luxury vessels to be built in the thereafter. From this prestigious commission, he received his largest commission up to 1932. He was awarded to design and furnishings the new RKO Roxy Center Theatre in Rockefeller Center. Although Schoen's work was received much praise from the critics, The RKO Roxy Center Theatre could not compete on a commercial level with Donald Deskey's Radio City Music Hall and was unfortunately torn down in 1954.

Inventory No: NAPT.1999.000014
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RKO Roxy Center Theatre

Inventory No: NAPT.1999.000014
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RKO Roxy Center Theatre

RKO Roxy Center Theatre, Rockefeller Center, New York:

Designed by Edward Durell Stone, with interiors by Eugene Schoen. RKO Roxy Theatre, with seating for 3,500, was located at the Southeast corner of Sixth AVenue and 49th Street, in New York City. Known for most of its short life as the Center Theatre, this Art Deco style movie palace was owned by the Rockefellers and was built in the South Block of Rockefeller Center. It opened as the “New RKO Roxy Theatre” on December 29th, 1932 with a stage show and a movie. The lobby had three ticket offices. The Grand Foyer was illuminated by day through five large exterior windows of opaque glass etched in relief. During darkness, the lighting was via three glass globes at ceiling height and two glass globes hanging lower. It was decorated in red and gold fabric with Bubinga mahogany walls and vermilion doors leading to the auditorium. The auditorium had 75 foot high walls which were African mahogany paneled and a ceiling decorated with figures from Greek mythology. Centered over the orchestra section was a 400 bulb, 104,000-watt chandelier, 25 feet in diameter and a weight of six tons. Claimed as the largest of its kind, the fixture required its own fan cooling system. The proscenium opening was 60 feet wide and extended in height from stage floor to the ceiling. Like Radio City Music Hall, the New RKO Roxy Theatre had three shallow mezzanines, with respective seating capacities accommodated a total capacity of 3,510. Like the Grand Foyer at Radio City Music Hall, the “New RKO Roxy Theatre” had a wide staircase and elevators to the top mezzanine, and a Grand Lounge in the basement. The theatre was equipped with a Wurlitzer organ of 4 manuals, 34 ranks. In March, 1933, the New RKO Roxy Theatre shared the New York premiere engagement of "King Kong" with Raido City Music Hall.

Both theatres supported the movie with a stage show, "Jungle Rhythms". After successful litigation by the owners of the original Roxy Theatre on 7th Avenue and 50th Street, the theatre was re-named the RKO Center Theatre in 1933 and it began to feature less costly second-run double bill film programs. In 1934, the RKO Center Theatre was dropped from the Center's name when it opened its first legitimate production, "The Great Waltz". When the show closed, the Center Theatre attempted showing films again. In February 1940, it hosted theNew York premiere engagement of Walt Disney's "Pinocchio". Movies did not succeed here, and the Center Theatre returned to presenting live shows, including some 'Ice Spectaculars', until it closed and became an NBC studio in 1950. In May 1954, NBC's lease expired and a decision had already been taken to demolish the theatre. The theatre was demolished in 1954, so that an office skyscraper (built to 'blend in' with the rest of Rockefeller Center) could be constructed on the sit.
 

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